Tag Archives: 4.5 Stars

Clockwork Princess (The Infernal Devices: Manga #3)

Read on 11th January, 2015

Author: Cassandra Clare

Artist: Hyekyung Baek

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4.5 Stars

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The threat of Mortmain’s Infernal Devices looms as the Shadowhunters race to work out a way to counteract the mechanical monsters. Meanwhile, plans for Tessa’s marriage to Jem are underway, despite her fiancé’s failing health and the unresolved feelings between her and Will. When Tessa is captured, Will must leave his comrade behind to save the woman they both love… But with the final missing piece -Tessa herself – in Mortmain’s possession, can anything stop his plot for revenge?

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I loved it. Clockwork Princess, in whatever form, is a stunning piece of work that toys with your emotions no matter how many times you read it. Although all of The Infernal Devices are brilliantly written and enthralling to the extreme, Clockwork Princess is perhaps the better of the three – however, being the finale (a Cassandra Clare finale, at note) it is expected to be spectacular and certainly does not fall short. Despite this, there are a few details from the book that are lacking in the manga.

In the previous installment, Clockwork Prince, one of the details missing was the mention of Adele, Starkweather’s granddaughter. Thankfully, this was rectified as the first thing that is seen upon opening Clockwork Princess is an excerpt of Adele’s story, which is later explained in greater depth as is true to the novel.

While the inclusion of the letters between the Consul and the Council are included (and thank goodness for that!), the text is barely legible and one must strain their eyes to read it.

The scones. That’s all I’m saying. The scones weren’t there.

In the novel, Tessa’s Clockwork Angel marks Will. For all those who have read Clockwork Princess, you’ll know what I mean and in what circumstances. This is not included in the manga. Keeping this as spoiler-free as possible, as a fan of The Mortal Instruments, this is a huge dillema. – Will’s mark, passed down through the generations, is how we find his bloodline in an important character. The scene was laid out, it would have been so easy to slip it in there, just add in an extra panel or so – I don’t understand why it was not included. At all.

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Clockwork Prince (The Infernal Devices: Manga #2)

Read on 11th January, 2015

Author: Cassandra Clare

Artist: Hyekyung Baek

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4.5 Stars

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Tessa Gray has found friends among the Shadowhunters, supernatural protectors of mankind who possess angelic blood. But Tessa’s new life is threatened when some members of the Clave challenge Charlotte’s leadership and pressure her to resign as head of the London Institute. If Charlotte is forced out, Tessa will be forced to leave as well due to her warlock blood, making her easy prey for the still-at-large Magister. As Tessa and her handsome Shadowhunter escorts, Will and Jem, journey far and wide to unravel the Magister’s secrets, they quickly learn that they have no secrets from the vengeful Magister… and nowhere is safe…

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Again, a great adaptation of the novel and a swift, easy read. However, I have three issues with Clockwork Prince: the Manga (aside from my continuing grievances at the visual depiction of Magnus Bane.

Upon their stay at the New York institute, Tessa did not stumble upon the portrait of Aloysius Starkweather’s granddaughter, nor hear his account of what happened to her, which is a major plot point in discovering what Tessa is, per say. I’m interested in how they’ll spin that one.

Whilst demon pox was still mentioned, I was gravely disappointed that there was no side story of Will believing it existed while no one else did, his little song that annoyed the hell out of everyone, and his gloating when he was proved right of his existence, milking it for all it was worth. That was a big highlight for me in the novel and I am rather sad to that it was not included.

In the novel, Bridget was infamous for her bellowing tunes (in Irish, I think it was, but I can’t quite recall) that irritated the hell out of everyone – they are key to what makes her such a strong character. Sadly, they were lacking in this adaption. I know that they can’t include everything, but the little details are always appreciated.

Clockwork Angel (The Infernal Devices: Manga #1)

Read on 10th January, 2015

Author: Cassandra Clare

Artist: Hyekyung Baek

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4.5 Stars

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A manga-adaption to the prequel of Cassandra Clare’s Mortal Instrumentsseries, The Infernal Devices is the story of Tessa Gray, a sixteen-year-old American girl traveling alone to Victorian London who runs afoul of the city’s sordid supernatural underworld. Rescued by the Shadowhunters of the London Institute, Tessa quickly finds herself caught up in an intrigue that may very well destroy her new friends – including the two enigmatic young men, Jem and Will, who have taken her under their wing…

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As my first novel/manga adaptation, Clockwork Angel was rather well done. The Infernal Devices is by far one of my favorite series, so when a friend asked of I’d like to read the manga adaptations, I couldn’t refuse.

Clockwork Angel: the Manga was an understandably swift read, lacking no major plot points or crucial information (if I’m wrong, do keep in mind that I read the novel over a year ago).

My only issue with the rendition is the portrayal of Magnus Bane. To be prompt: he looks like a girl. I am not happy.

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See how depressing this is!? I just – there are no words to adequately express my devastation. No words. None.

Aside from that, I quite enjoyed the manga and I recommend it to any fan of The Infernal Devices looking for a quick read from a great series.

The FitzOsbornes at War (Montmaray Journals #3)

Read on 24th September, 2014

Author: Michelle Cooper

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4.5 Stars

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Michelle Cooper completes her heart-stealing epic drama of history and romance with The FitzOsbornes at War.

Sophie FitzOsborne and the royal family of Montmaray escaped their remote island home when the Nazis attacked. But as war breaks out in England and around the world, nowhere is safe. Sophie fills her journal with tales of a life during wartime. Blackouts and the Blitz. Dancing in nightclubs with soliders on leave. And endlessly waiting for news of her brother Toby, whose plane was shot down over enemy territory.

But even as bombs rain down on London, hope springs up, and love blooms for this most endearing princess. And when the Allies begin to drive their way across Europe, the FitzOsbornes take heart—maybe, just maybe, there will be a way to liberate Montmaray as well.

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A beautiful story that will brake your heart – multiple times – and make you laugh to no end. A story of bravery, intelligence, loss, family, growing up and the realities of war. The FitzOsbornes at War is absolutely stunning, with twists and turns that will have you smiling and balling your eyes out, laughing and grieving. The characters that you’ve grown to love will not disappoint, but rather endear themselves to you further. A brilliant conclusion to a wonderful series.

I cried – boy did I cry – but I was sucked into a torrent of emotions that would not let me go. After that absolutely heart-wrenching moment (about three quarters or so in – you’ll know exactly what I’m talking about once you’ve read it), the smallest things made me remember and a new round of tears burst forth. The thing is though, The FotzOsbornes at War, while terribly sad at some parts, was not a massive sob story – so don’t let that turn you off from reading it! It was the perfect finale to the trilogy and as beautifully written as the previous books.

There was so much character development. We’d grown to love them, but now we were able to see them flourish and face the harsh realities of life and war. Losses were sustained, old friends came back, relationships were tested, new love was found and support shared. All this came full circle and made them become stronger people, a closer family. Thankfully, Rebecca was hardly mentioned, I grew to love Simon and Henry – she grew up too fast, but I absolutely adore her and couldn’t get enough of her. The other characters were brilliant as well and I just loved them all!

Wow, my eyes are still prickling with tears… But The FitzOsbornes at War is definitely high on my recommendations – it is just an absolutely stunning piece of work that deeply touched my heart and which I hope will touch yours too.

The Maze Runner (The Maze Runner #1)

Read on 22nd September, 2014

Author: James Dashner

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4.5 Stars

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If you ain’t scared, you ain’t human.

When Thomas wakes up in the lift, the only thing he can remember is his name. He’s surrounded by strangers—boys whose memories are also gone.

Nice to meet ya, shank. Welcome to the Glade.

Outside the towering stone walls that surround the Glade is a limitless, ever-changing maze. It’s the only way out—and no one’s ever made it through alive.

Everything is going to change.

Then a girl arrives. The first girl ever. And the message she delivers is terrifying.

Remember. Survive. Run.

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An action-packed, riveting, fast-paced, page-turning novel, The Maze Runner is everything you could ask for and more.

Typically, I don’t go for books with lots of action and a male protagonists, but The Maze Runner had me enthralled. I honestly don’t have any criticism for this novel – it was believable, realistic, fast-paced but by no means rushed, the characters were quite intellectual, it had great character development not only of the main protagonist, but the side characters – it was just a brilliant read.

That ending though… Well, you’ll know what I’m talking about if you’ve read the book…

I highly recommend this for fans of dystopian, adventure, sci-fi, with a hint of romance.

I’m interested to see how the movie turns out – if it’s anything like the book. I suspect as much, but you never know…

The Giver (The Giver #1)

Read from 20-21st September, 2014

Author: Lois Lowry

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4.5 Stars

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Jonas’s world is perfect. Everything is under control. There is no war or fear or pain. There are no choices. Every person is assigned a role in the Community. When Jonas turns twelve, he is singled out to receive special training from The Giver. The Giver alone holds the memories of the true pain and pleasure of life. Now, it is time for Jonas to receive the truth. There is no turning back.

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A hauntingly enchanting read that makes you think about the deeper issues in life. The Giver – “the book that made dystopia” – is a classic read for all ages.

This novel is beautifully written. The language is eloquent and intelligent, delivering an intriguing story based in a fascinating world so unlike our own, yet believable all the same.

I found this utopian society fascinating. At first, I actually felt like I wanted to be part of The Community – it sounded pretty cool. Everyone seemed intelligent, you pretty much got your idea job, and marriages seemed to work out pretty well. But then we started to see the flaws. There was no books to read for fun, there was no love, I’m not even going to go near the releasing process (how can anyone be okay with that? And if they truly feel that it is the right thing to do, why do they lie about it?) – oh, and there’s no colour. Literally. Everything’s in black and white – the “Sameness” is what the Giver called it.

The concepts and importance of identity, memory, emotions and choice were addressed. Lois writes, “It was a community without danger or pain. But it was also a community without music, colour or art. And it was a community without books.”

The ending, however, let me down. While there are three other books in the quartet, they are seemingly unrelated to The Giver – so we don’t find out what happens to the characters we have grown to love. I understand the idea of “open-ended” book, but I felt that the ending was rushed and that the novel didn’t really have a conclusion.

Despite this, I did love the story. The Giver is a book that can be read on a philosophical level or just for fun. Either way, I believe that this well-rounded book can be read by all ages (starting with children around eleven).

I look forward to seeing the movie – the characters have been ages about four years and a romance has been added in, but I’m interested in how true the movie is to the book.

The FitzOsbornes in Exile (Montmaray Journals #2)

Read from 2nd-10th September, 2014

Author: Michelle Cooper

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4.5 Stars

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Forced to leave their island kingdom, Sophie FitzOsborne and her eccentric family take shelter in England. Sophie’s dreams of making her debut in shimmering ballgowns are finally coming true, but how can she enjoy her new life when they have all lost so much?

Aunt Charlotte is ruthless in her quest to see Sophie and Veronica married off by the end of the Season, Toby is as charming and lazy as ever, Henry is driving her governess to the brink of madness, and the battle of wills between Simon and Veronica continues. Can Sophie keep her family together, when everything seems to be falling apart?

An enticing glimpse into high society, the cut and thrust of politics as nations scramble to avert world war, and the hidden depths of a family in exile, struggling to find their place in the world.

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I absolutely adored this book. While I enjoyed this book much more that A Brief History of Montmaray, it was necessary to read the prequel to full appreciate the sequel.

I highly recommend this book as it is a great read that you can pick up at any time. As I’m back at school, I have only had time to read on the bus and occasionally in class. However, this did not reduce my appreciation for this novel at all. It is a great novel if you’re busy but still want something to read on the go.

In my previous review, I expressed my irritation with Sophie as a character and a narrator. I am elated to inform you that Sophie has matured a lot and it was a pleasure to journey with her. In fact, all of the characters grew and developed beautifully – I loved them all! (Save that awful Mosley and Rebecca – but thankfully she didn’t make much of an appearance).

The FitzOsbornes in Exile is a unique and universal read. It focuses on friendships and family relationships as opposed to blind romance. The novel gives us a glimpse into the reality of post WWI England in the face of WWII. Mixed up in all of this is gender inequality, what they don’t tell you about marriage, what is seen as proper as opposed to genuine relationships, the lead up to WWII, the state of the politics at the time, and much more.

A truly well-rounded, exceptional read, The FitzOsbornes in Exile is a beautiful read of which I highly recommend. Admittedly, the first book in the series A Brief History of Montmaray was not the most captivating to me, but I advise you persist with the series, knowing that the second book is that much better.