The FitzOsbornes in Exile (Montmaray Journals #2)

Read from 2nd-10th September, 2014

Author: Michelle Cooper

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4.5 Stars

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Forced to leave their island kingdom, Sophie FitzOsborne and her eccentric family take shelter in England. Sophie’s dreams of making her debut in shimmering ballgowns are finally coming true, but how can she enjoy her new life when they have all lost so much?

Aunt Charlotte is ruthless in her quest to see Sophie and Veronica married off by the end of the Season, Toby is as charming and lazy as ever, Henry is driving her governess to the brink of madness, and the battle of wills between Simon and Veronica continues. Can Sophie keep her family together, when everything seems to be falling apart?

An enticing glimpse into high society, the cut and thrust of politics as nations scramble to avert world war, and the hidden depths of a family in exile, struggling to find their place in the world.

* * * * * * * * * *

I absolutely adored this book. While I enjoyed this book much more that A Brief History of Montmaray, it was necessary to read the prequel to full appreciate the sequel.

I highly recommend this book as it is a great read that you can pick up at any time. As I’m back at school, I have only had time to read on the bus and occasionally in class. However, this did not reduce my appreciation for this novel at all. It is a great novel if you’re busy but still want something to read on the go.

In my previous review, I expressed my irritation with Sophie as a character and a narrator. I am elated to inform you that Sophie has matured a lot and it was a pleasure to journey with her. In fact, all of the characters grew and developed beautifully – I loved them all! (Save that awful Mosley and Rebecca – but thankfully she didn’t make much of an appearance).

The FitzOsbornes in Exile is a unique and universal read. It focuses on friendships and family relationships as opposed to blind romance. The novel gives us a glimpse into the reality of post WWI England in the face of WWII. Mixed up in all of this is gender inequality, what they don’t tell you about marriage, what is seen as proper as opposed to genuine relationships, the lead up to WWII, the state of the politics at the time, and much more.

A truly well-rounded, exceptional read, The FitzOsbornes in Exile is a beautiful read of which I highly recommend. Admittedly, the first book in the series A Brief History of Montmaray was not the most captivating to me, but I advise you persist with the series, knowing that the second book is that much better.

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